Symposium: Well-being and the Life Course: Intercultural and Intergenerational Perspectives, 24-25 Sept 2015

14 Sep 2015

Symposium: Well-being and the Life Course: Intercultural and Intergenerational Perspectives, 24-25 Sept  2015

This launch event for the new Centre for Innovation and Research in Well-being seeks to foster intercultural perspectives on well-being and the life course by bringing together researchers working in a variety of contexts in the global North and South, from multiple disciplinary backgrounds. Intercultural and intergenerational perspectives are crucial if we wish to question normative understandings of well-being, and to sharpen recognition of the role of culture and politics in shaping desires and possibilities of differing life pursuits. The symposium will be framed around the following themes:

• Youth Transitions and Well-being

• Migration, Well-being and the Life Course

• Intergenerational Dynamics and Well-being

• Ageing, Retirement and the Life Course

 

Speakers will include:

- Professor Jo Boyden, University of Oxford

- Professor Charles Watters, University of Sussex

- Professor Viginia Morrow, University of Oxford

- Dr Gina Crivello, University of Oxford

- Professor Janet Boddy, University of Sussex

- Professor Paul Statham, University of Sussex

- Professor Maya Unnithan, University of Sussex

- Professor Ilse Derluyn, Ghent University

- Penny Shimmin, Chief Executive,

- Sussex Community Development Association

- Dr Elaine Chase, University of Oxford

 

Dates: 24 and 25 September 2015

Location: Bramber House, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QU.

Registration: There is a charge of £75 for this event (including lunch and refreshments). A limited number of places will be available for students at half price, assigned on a first-come-first-served basis. Last few places remaining - available to book from the University of Sussex.

To reserve a place access the conference website or contact Keira Pratt-Boyden:

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